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Durite split charge relay

Splitters

£15.96

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A split charge relay allows you to charge two battery banks at once from your vehicle or boat alternator.

When the engine is running, the relay closes to connect the two battery banks together to allow simultanious charging. When the engine is switched off, the banks are separated.

Two versions available, one for 12V alternators rated up to 100A and one for 24V alternators up to 60A max charging current. Zero voltage drop.

2 x M6 studs and 2 x 6.3mm blade connectors. Mounting bracket included.

To use, connect a cable from the positive terminals of each battery bank to the large studs on the relay labelled '87' and '30'. Ensure this cable is thick enough to carry the maximum charging current of your alternator.

Next run a light cable from the small terminal on your alternator marked 'F' or 'D' to terminal 85 on the split charge relay (this is the same terminal that will be connected to your charge warning light - don't disconnect the warning light though!). Finally run a light cable from terminal 86 to your common negative.

The disadvantage to using a split charge relay over other more sophisticated solutions is that is does not prevent a very flat secondary bank from draining your main bank when the engine is running. If your secondary bank is very low ensure the engine is run for long enough to charge all batteries to a good level before switching off.

A split charge relay cannot control power from solar panels or wind turbines, but it can be used to control alternator charging on systems where the solar or wind power is connected directly to one of the battery banks.

You may also be interested in the wiring harness for this relay.

To charge two separate battery banks from a single solar panel array, see the Morningstar Duo. For more information see charging two banks simultaneously.